Finn Slough – 2015 (7 photos)

Moving toward the mouth of the Fraser River we came upon Finn Slough.  Finn Slough was established in the 1880’s by Finnish immigrant fishers. What remains now are a collection of 18 houses renovated from net mending sheds, boat houses and original houses. Some of the houses are floating and others are on pilings. Because the land is below the high tide line these houses are without official status or land tenure. Attempts have been made recently to obtain Crown Leases to make these houses ‘legal’ and the Finn Slough Heritage and Wetland Society has been formed to try to preserve the unique atmosphere of the settlement.

Looking out at the Fraser River from the entrance of Finn Slough.

Looking out at the Fraser River from the entrance of Finn Slough.

The Dinner Plate Island School and the historic 28 foot gillnetter

The Dinner Plate Island School and the historic 28 foot gillnetter “Eva” built in 1939 at the Kishi Boatworks in nearby Steveston, BC.

The Slough

The Slough

Bald Eagle keeping watch for fish

Bald Eagle keeping watch for fish

A wooden drawbridge connects the mainland to Gilmore Island. A section of the bridge lifts up to allow boats to go through. This end of the river and slough are tide so water levels are always changing.

A wooden drawbridge connects the mainland to Gilmore Island. A section of the bridge lifts up to allow boats to go through. This end of the river and slough are tidal so water levels are always changing.

Looking down the slough at a couple of the unique slough houses.

Looking down the slough at a couple of the unique slough houses.

Old house with what I think are large rolls of old net lines.

Old house with what I think are large rolls of old fish net lines.


9 comments

      • Because these houses are on the river the level fluctuations aren’t as dramatic as ocean tidal changes. I would guess the water here might make a 10 foot change. These pictures were taken when the tide was quite high so the water is in its upper range. The main problem would be Spring snow runoff in the river combined with an exceptionally high tide. These, the super high tides, occur usually two or three times a year. On the ocean where we live the tide can change as much as 16 feet so all docks and buildings on pilings have to be take that in account when being constructed.


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