Bringing Home Lunch – 2013

This ant is dragging home a Pacific Coast Termite (Zootermopis angusticollis) which is pretty impressive as the termite obviously outweighs the ant.  We are usually plagued by flying termite queens in the hot evenings of late August when they leave their nest to start anew.  Their flying time is very short and when the queen thinks she has found a new location she loses her wings and starts boring.  They are part of the Rotting-wood Termite family and as the name states, they look for moist, rotten wood to nest in.  

As far as ants are concerned, I know they are supposed to be very organized but after watching their behaviour for many hours I have to say they aren’t the most efficient creatures.  Just when you think they are carrying their treasure to their colony they will turn around and head in a completely different direction.  I don’t know if they get confused with other scent trails but it seems they eventually only find their way home by luck.  They have more patience than I do.  

Ant's Lunch_watermarked

Hand Me a Level Please – 2006

This was taken at the New Ross Farm Museum in New Brunswick.  The original Mr. Ross was given 300 acres as payment for military duties in the 1700’s.  He farmed the land and it remained in the family until 1969 when it was made into a farm museum.

Most of the buildings are original and it is still a working farm using the original 1800’s methods – no power machinery or power tools. All the staff are in 1800’s dress doing what they would have been doing in that time. The buildings include a barn, a sawmill, cooperage (barrel making), blacksmith and the original farmhouse. 

The farmhouse had actually been lived in by five generations of Ross’s, the last moving out in 1969 when they turned the farm over to the heritage society. The interior is quite amazing with most of the original woodwork and furniture.

This isn't lens distortion you are looking at.  After 5 generations there has obviously been some settling issues which added to the charm of the old farmhouse.

This isn’t lens distortion you are looking at. After 5 generations there has obviously been some settling issues which added to the charm of the old farmhouse.

Many of the animals are heritage animals – those of the same lineage as those from the 1790’s – Berkshire pigs, Canadian horses, oxen, cows and sheep.